Power

Connect the Dots on Solar Energy

The U.S. Department of Energy's Solar Energy Technologies Office (SETO) has launched the Connect the Dots on Solar Energy campaign, focusing on community solar. Community solar is a business model that benefits more households through shared solar installations, which saves money, creates economic opportunities, increases grid resilience, allows people to own their power production, and benefits the environment. SETO has highlighted community solar through the National Community Solar Partnership Annual Summit, announcing initiatives such as the Community Power Accelerator and the Community Power Accelerator Prize. Americans are choosing solar energy to power their lives, and SETO is demonstrating how solar energy investments benefit individuals, communities, and the nation over years. Solar energy creates household savings, which can dramatically reduce energy bills for solar owners. Community solar can provide savings for renters or those with unsuitable roofs for solar panels and help low-income households reduce their energy burden. Solar deployment creates economic opportunities from manufacturing to installation and maintenance and can contribute to growing local economies. Solar installations help maintain power during extreme weather and disruptions such as cyber threats, and solar electricity provides the power to own energy production. Transitioning to renewable energy helps improve air and water quality and reduces greenhouse gas emissions that exacerbate climate change. Community solar allows individuals, businesses, nonprofits, and other groups to benefit from solar projects within a geographic area. Community solar customers can buy or lease a portion of the solar panels and receive an electric bill credit for electricity generated by their share of the community solar system. Community solar is growing across the country, and there are enabling policies and third-party markets for community solar in about a third of states. The economic opportunity for community solar varies depending on the state's laws and regulations. Subscribers typically receive two bills from the community solar program and the utility for traditionally generated electricity consumed. Community solar enables utilities to strategically locate systems in areas of the grid that can benefit the most, improve their relationships with customers, and increase engagement. SETO is advancing community solar through the National Community Solar Partnership and the Solar in Your Community Challenge, working to expand access to affordable community solar to every American household by 2025. Partners leverage peer networks and technical assistance resources to overcome barriers to expanding community solar access to underserved communities.

Connect the Dots on Solar Energy. The U.S. Department of Energy’s Solar Energy Technologies Office (SETO) has launched the Connect the Dots on Solar Energy campaign. It focuses on community solar, a business model that benefits more households through shared solar installations. It saves money, creates economic opportunities, and increases grid resilience. Moreover, allows people to own their power production and benefits the environment.

SETO has highlighted community solar through the National Community Solar Partnership Annual Summit. It announced initiatives such as the Community Power Accelerator and the Community Power Accelerator Prize. Americans are choosing solar energy to power their lives. And SETO demonstrates how solar energy investments have benefited individuals, communities, and the nation over the years.

Solar energy creates household savings, which can dramatically reduce energy bills for solar owners. Community solar can provide savings for renters or those with unsuitable roofs for solar panels and help low-income households reduce their energy burden. Solar deployment creates economic opportunities from manufacturing to installation and maintenance and can contribute to growing local economies.

Solar installations help maintain power during extreme weather and disruptions such as cyber threats, and solar electricity provide the power to own energy production. Transitioning to renewable energy helps improve air and water quality and reduces greenhouse gas emissions exacerbating climate change.

Firstly, community solar allows individuals, businesses, nonprofits, and other groups to benefit from solar projects within a geographic area. Secondly, those customers can buy or lease a portion of the solar panels and receive an electric bill credit for electricity generated by their share of the community solar system. Thirdly, the community is growing across the country, and there are enabling policies and third-party markets for community solar in about a third of states.

The economic opportunity for community solar varies depending on the state’s laws and regulations. Subscribers typically receive two bills from the community solar program and the utility for traditionally generated electricity consumed. Community solar enables utilities to strategically locate systems in areas of the grid that can benefit the most, improve their relationships with customers, and increase engagement.

In conclusion, SETO is advancing community solar through the National Community Solar Partnership and the Solar in Your Community Challenge to expand access to affordable community solar to every American household by 2025. Finally, Partners leverage peer networks and technical assistance resources to overcome barriers to expanding community solar access to underserved communities.

Link of interest: The Power of Ocean Waves with New Technologies

Link of interest: Solar Energy Technologies Office

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