Industrial Consumers Power

Bloom Energy to deliver 1st heat and power project in South Korea

Bloom Energy

Bloom Energy, a U.S. company headquartered in California, will deliver the first combined heat and power (CHP) project in South Korea; un a joint collaboration with SK ecoplant. The project will have up to 4,2 megawatts of capacity at utility-scale; it will include solid oxide fuel cell technology.

Firstly, the CHP technology simultaneously utilizes both the electricity it generates and the excess thermal energy it emits to recover and reuse it during the power generation process. The project that Bloom Energy will deliver, will have a   heat recovery system designed by SK ecoplant.

Secondly, from the captured heat, the project will also provide energy and warm water to the communities nearby Bukpyung Recreational and Sports Center; overall improving the building’s energy efficiency. The project would also reduce CO2 emissions.

Thirdly, Bloom Energy and its partner expect to begin construction of the project later this year. As said above, the new 4.2 MW utility-scale CHP installation will leverage Bloom’s solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) technology, that Bloom Energy will configure in an innovative Power Tower format.

Moreover, it will be a system designed for maximum power density in a condensed footprint; also, the Power Tower will vertically stack 1.8 MW of Bloom Energy Servers in a pillar architecture.

Also recommended for you: RNG project in Colo. to be developed by Canadian Green Impact Partners. Click here to read.

Bloom Energy and SK ecoplant to deliver top tech solution for south koreans

On the other hand, the CHP facility will locate in Donghae City, in the Gangwon province of South Korea; the power generated at the site will produce 35,000-megawatt hours per year of highly efficient; also, clean and resilient electricity. While capturing 4 million megacalories of thermal energy through the Power Tower and SK ecoplant’s heat recovery system.

Furthermore, the CHP project will also be a very low carbon emitter, as the SOFC technology uses a non-combustion; electrochemical process to produce electricity with reduced carbon emissions compared to the grid alternative and with virtually no harmful smog-forming particulate matter.

In addition, Venkat Venkataraman, chief technology officer of Bloom Energy, said. “We are thrilled to partner with SK ecoplant to bring this innovative and exciting project to life, marking a new milestone for Bloom Energy.”

Finally, he remarked. “Not only can we efficiently generate clean and reliable energy for an important utility, Korea East-West Power; but also we are eager and humbled to supply heat to the local community center; so that residents can enjoy activities during harsh winter months.”

Related posts

15MW Solar complex in Connecticut faces environmental dispute

editor

AWEA sets a road map for clean energy in 2021

editor

Luma Energy to take over operations of the Puerto Rico’s electricity grid

editor

Leave a Comment