Downstream Midstream Power Upstream Women in Energy

PSEG and Rowan University SWE develop women mentoring partnership

A new mentoring initiative between PSEG and the Rowan University Society of Women Engineers (SWE) could boost female participation in the energy sector. This opportunity could be particularly of help for both women engineers and the energy labor market.

Read more of our news content, here; U.S. and Canada representatives concerned over Mexico’s energy policies

About the women mentoring partnership

Today, the Rowan University Society of Women Engineers (SWE) and the Public Service Enterprise Group (PSEG) Nuclear chapter of U.S. Women in Nuclear (WIN) announced they have developed a mentoring partnership. Particularly, this initiative will allow students in Rowan Engineering to work with professionals at PSEG in numerous ways.

Accordingly, one of the strategic objectives of the PSEG Nuclear chapter of WIN is to enhance understanding and awareness of the value of nuclear energy and technology. Similarly, WIN aims to achieve this learning through community service and outreach initiatives.

PSEG is also exploring ways to increase the diversity of its workforce; in support of its strategic diversity, equity, and inclusion goals.

Benefits of the partnership

To consolidate this partnership, Rowan alumna Emily Bauer, MBA ’14, reached out to Rowan SWE. After several conversations, both parties agreed to create the mentorship program. In this way, this program will allow Rowan students to work with one of the leading energy companies in the nation. Besides, it will provide PSEG with a pool of highly qualified engineering candidates.

Similarly, Rowan students will gain insight into PSEG internship and career opportunities. Additionally, they’ll receive personalized career advice from members of PSEG Nuclear WIN. According to the parties, future initiatives may also include participation in professional development events.

Besides, as Rowan SWE notes in a release, it is essential to retain women in engineering programs. Lastly, this mentorship program aims to increase diversity in the field of engineering. The program was established for the Spring 2021 semester and will continue in the Fall 2021 semester.

Reception and Outlook

In this sense, Dr. Stephanie Farrell, Interim Dean of the Henry M. Rowan College of Engineering, commented in a release; “This partnership between Rowan and PSEG Nuclear will allow our students to work with engineering professionals. Also, to learn from some of the best in the field of energy.”

With respect to what SWE achieved through this partnership, Farrell said; Indeed, “SWE has always done extraordinary work on campus and in the community. So, I’m sure that will continue with PSEG Nuclear WIN.”

Similarly, Roshni Gandhi, ’21, President of Rowan SWE, said; “Rowan SWE is extremely grateful to PSEG Nuclear WIN for their willingness to volunteer time and resources to offer mentorship, career advice, and professional opportunities to our members.”

In fact, “Being able to hear from practicing members in the industry helps us define our career paths and set goals for ourselves,” Gandhi added.

The importance of more women in STEM roles

On the other hand, Sheila Rostiac, Senior VP, Chief Human Resources Officer, and Chief Diversity Officer with PSEG, commented; “PSEG is excited to expand our partnership with the Society of Women Engineers.

Notably, “we need more women in STEM roles, but barriers still exist. Therefore, women need to know they aren’t alone, and that is why mentorship is so important,” she continued. Thus, having a mentor that can provide guidance opens the door to new possibilities. Further, our employees at PSEG are committed to supporting these women‘s journeys. 

Finally, “with this partnership, we are forming another important diverse talent pipeline,” Rostiac concluded.

Related posts

Wind turbines of Duke Energy, among the nations tallest; peek a look

editor

Canada-Belgium-US consortium willing to bid for Petrobras Top Natgas Import Pipeline

editor

The U.S. keeps assessing reported leak at Chinese nuclear power plant

editor

Leave a Comment